KeyNOTE Speakers

Dr. Dorthe Dahl-Jensen

Professor, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Canada Excellence Research Chair, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg
Fields of expertise: Reconstruction of past climates from ice core and borehole data, evolution of the Greenland Ice Sheet, flow properties of natural ice
Preliminary title
Past climates from cryospheric archives
Time Slot
Monday 21 September, morning session
WEBSITE
https://www.nbi.ku.dk/english/staff/?pure=en/persons/45103

Dorthe Dahl-Jensen's research has focused on the reconstruction of past climates from deep ice cores drilled on the Greenland ice sheet. She has led several deep drilling efforts in Greenland, including the NEEM and EGRIP projects and participated in the EPICA project in Antarctica. The ice core data have yielded detailed knowledge on climate conditions during past glacial and interglacial periods and Dorthe's group has intensively studied periods of rapid warming during the last glacial period, the Dansgaard-Oeschger events. Dorthe has also used borehole thermometry to reconstruct past temperature changes and developed ice-flow models used in the dating of ice cores. She studies the mechanical properties of ice, the development of anisotropy in ice sheets and the flow behaviour of ice streams. As research chair at the University of Manitoba, Dorthe focuses on the effects of freshwater input to the ocean due to increased melting of the ice in Greenland and Arctic Canada.

Dr. Valerie Masson-Delmotte

Co-Chair, Working Group I IPCC
Senior Scientist (Director of Research) at CEA (French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission)
Fields of expertise: Understanding the mechanisms of changes in climate, the water cycle and sea level
Preliminary title
Global warming and the cryosphere
Time Slot
Monday 21 September, morning session
WEBSITE
https://www.lsce.ipsl.fr/Phocea/Pisp/index.php?nom=valerie.masson

Valerie Masson-Delmotte's research has evolved around documenting past climate variability using natural archives (ice cores, tree rings) and stable isotope tools. She has studied the climate variability of the last centuries, abrupt climate changes during the last glacial period and the glacial-interglacial cycles. She has worked on projects in Greenland, Antarctica, Tibet, and Europe. She has also used climate models to simulate past changes on different spatial and temporal scales. Valerie has a long-term involvement in the sharing of results from climate science with stakeholders, children and the general public. She has also been involved in multi-disciplinary research projects and committee work with scientists from the life, health, and social sciences on topics related to water, climate-change impacts, perception, adaptation and mitigation strategies.

Dr. Eric Rignot

Chair and Donald Bren Professor of Earth System Science at University of California Irvine, USA
Fields of expertise: The response of the ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland to climate change, interactions of ice and climate, global sea level, satellite remote sensing and ocean circulation.
Preliminary title
On the difficulties of projecting future ice sheet melt and why observations remain paramount
Time Slot
Monday 21 September, morning session
WEBSITE
https://faculty.sites.uci.edu/erignot/

Eric Rignot studies the interactions of ice and climate, in particular to determine how the ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland will respond to climate change in the coming century and how they affect global sea level. His research groups at UC Irvine and JPL combine satellite remote sensing techniques (imaging radar interferometry, laser altimetry, optical imagery), airborne geophysical surveys (gravity, radar depth sounder), shipborne surveys (multi-beam echo sounding, conductivity-temperature-depth profiles, robotic devices), and field surveys (ground penetrating radars, ground portable radar interferometer, GPS) and numerical modeling (ice sheet models ISSM, and ocean models MITgcm). The group's work is about the causes and effects of climate change on ice sheets, but also connects with solutions to climate change and adaptation and mitigation strategies.

Dr. Konrad Steffen

Director WSL, Professor Climate and Cryosphere ETH Zürich and EPFL, Switzerland
Fields of expertise: Arctic climatology, ice sheet stability, global sea level rise, ice sheet and climate interactions
Preliminary title
The melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet:
How does it affect the global sea level?
Time Slot
Monday 21 September, morning session
WEBSITE
www.wsl.ch/de/mitarbeitende/steffen.html

Konrad Steffen studied natural sciences and obtained his doctoral degree from ETH Zurich in 1984. In 1990, he was appointed Professor of Climatology at the University of Colorado in Boulder, USA, where he later also headed the research institute CIRES. In 2011, the Federal Council appointed him Director of WSL,and since 2012 he has also been Professor of Climate and Cryosphere at ETH Zurich and EPFL. Konrad Steffen is a member of renowned international bodies and he remains active in research, in particular in polar and high-alpine regions. He contineues to make  important contributions to science and he is also leading the new Swiss Polar Institute. He was one of the authors of the Cryosphere Chapter in IPCC’s Fifth World Climate Report and a lead author of the new IPCC report on Oceans and the Cryosphere.

Dr. Mark Serreze

Director of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), Boulder, USA
Distinguished Professor, Department of Geography, University of Colorado
Fields of expertise: Arctic climate; global implications; and climate warming in the Arctic
Preliminary title
The future of sea ice in the Arctic
Time Slot
Monday 21 September, afternoon session
WEBSITE
https://nsidc.org/research/bios/serreze.html

Mark Serreze´s research has encompassed all aspects of the planet's cryosphere – i.e. snow and ice cover – with special emphasis on the Arctic. His research interests include atmosphere–sea-ice interactions, synoptic climatology, boundary-layer problems, and climate change. He has conducted field work in the Canadian Arctic on sea ice and ice caps, and on the Alaskan tundra. Efforts over the past ten years have increasingly focused on trying to make sense of the rapid environmental changes being observed in the Arctic. Mark is a leading authority on Arctic climate and his books include the award-winning textbook The Arctic Climate System (2005) and Brave New Arctic: The Untold Story of the Melting North, which has received critical acclaim for its impact on audiences beyond academia.

Dr. Julia Boike

Senior Researcher, Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI), Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany
Fields of expertise: Permafrost, soil physics, processes in the periglacial environment
preliminary title
Arctic Permafrost: The consequences of thaw
Time Slot
Monday 21 September, afternoon session
WEBSITE
https://www.awi.de/ueber-uns/organisation/mitarbeiter/julia-boike.html

Julia Boike's  passion is the multidisciplinary science of permafrost – understanding the the frozen Earth and how it is tied to our global climate system.  She has travelled to Arctic field sites every year for more than 25 years and observed the on-going changes at remote places, such as Arctic Canada, Alaska, Eastern Siberia, and Svalbard. She uses innovative instruments that allow her to observe these changes at different scales, from the microscopic structure of snow and permafrost to the landscape-sized distribution of patterned ground. Together with her research group she undertakes long-term studies to find out more about how permafrost affects the exchange of energy and water between the ground and the air. Working together with climate modellers, her data provide the basis for including permafrost in models of the Earth’s climate system.

Dr. Olga Makarieva

Leading Research Scientist at Melnikov Permafrost Institute, Yakutsk
Associate Professor at Saint Petersburg State University, Russia
Fields of expertise: Hydrological processes in permafrost environments, dangerous hydrological phenomena, mathematical modelling
Preliminary title
Arctic hydrology and cryospheric change
Time Slot
Monday 21 September, afternoon session
WEBSITE
http://www.hydrograph-model.ru

Olga Makarieva's scientific interests are cold region hydrology with focus on river flow-permafrost interactions and their changes in a non-stationary environment. She has worked on the development and enhancement of a process-oriented, robust, hydrological model, which can be applied in different permafrost landscapes with the ability to use observable characteristics of watersheds as parameters. Her research is focused on the impact of climate and landscape changes on the hydrological regime, engineering calculations of runoff, remote sensing data, the transformation of the hydrological regime, groundwater, the influence of the active layer of permafrost on runoff formation and mountain hydrology.

Dr. Mandira Singh Shrestha

Programme Coordinator, Climate Services & Hi-Risk, ICIMOD, Kathmandu, Nepal
Fields of expertise: water resources management including transboundary flood risk management, hydraulic and hydrologic modelling and hydropower projects
preliminary title
Snow, ice and runoff in high mountain areas
Time Slot
Monday 21 September, afternoon session
WEBSITE
http://www.icimod.org/?q=7471

Mandira Singh Shrestha has 20 years of experience in water resources management including transboundary flood risk management, hydraulic and hydrologic modelling and hydropower projects. Prior to joining ICIMOD, she worked for several organisations; in the USA as a water resources engineer for hydro-electric and water resources projects, and later for the Association for Research and Management, Norplan, Butwal Power Company, and Care Nepal. At ICIMOD she coordinates regional programmes on transboundary flood risk reduction in the Hindu Kush-Himalayan (HKH) region and application of satellite based rainfall estimates for flood prediction. She is the Executive Secretary of HKH-FRIEND, an IHP/UNESCO programme, coordinating all activities with international and regional collaborating institutions.

Dr. Astrid Ogilvie

Senior Scientist, Stefansson Arctic Institute, Akureyri, Iceland
Fields of expertise: Building bridges between the social sciences, humanities, and the natural sciences in a wide variety of research projects in order to further understanding of long-term human ecodynamics and climate change.
Preliminary title
Of Ice and Men: From Polar Exploration to Polar Research
Time Slot
Monday 21 September, afternoon session
WEBSITE
https://instaar.colorado.edu/people/astrid-e-j-ogilvie/

Astrid Ogilvie is a climate historian and human ecologist. Her overarching career goal is to build bridges between the arts, humanities, and the natural sciences, in order to foster interdisciplinary cross-fertilization. Her research focuses on environmental and climatic history, and human ecology in North Atlantic and Arctic regions, in particular Iceland, Greenland, Norway, and Labrador/Nunatsiavut. Her particular expertise is the analysis of primary historical texts in the Scandinavian languages, including Icelandic.

Further areas of interest include: The historical climatology of northern Europe; the reconstruction of historical sea-ice records, in particular Iceland; long term human eco-dynamics; the comparison, integration and syntheses of climate proxy time series; and changing seasonality in the Arctic. In addition to her appointment in Iceland, Astrid is a Fellow at INSTAAR (the Insitute of Arctic and Alpine Research) at the University of Colorado, Boulder, an Adjunct Professor at Hunter College, CUNY, New York, and Royal Roads University, Canada, a Visiting Professor at the University of the Highlands and Islands, Kirkwall, Orkney, and a Visiting Fellow at the Climate Research Unit, Norwich, UK. She was Nansen Professor of Arctic Studies at the University of Akureyri, Iceland in 2014.

Dr. Michael Zemp

Director of the World Glacier Monitoring Service and Professor at the Department of Geography, University of Zurich, Switzerland
Fields of expertise: Earth observation technologies and geoinformatics and their application to the investigation of climate-glacier interactions
Preliminary title
Global estimations of glacier mass changes from glaciological and geodetic methods
Time Slot
Wednesday 23 September, morning session
WEBSITE
https://www.geo.uzh.ch/~mzemp/

Michael Zemp´s research has evolved from glaciers and climate studies in the European Alps to global assessments of glacier changes and related contributions to sea-level rise. Besides his studies he has worked in the Natural Catastrophe Risk Management at Winterthur Insurance and later as GIS specialist at ESRI Switzerland. Since 2010, he has been leading the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS) and he has been involved with various scientific projects of the Department of Geography of the University of Zurich.

Dr. Regine Hock

Professor of Geophysics, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, USA
Fields of expertise: Glacier mass balance, glaciermeteorology and hydrology, modeling the response of glaciers to climate change,contribution of glacier meltwater to global sea-level rise
Preliminary title
Glaciers in a warming climate – impacts on sea level and streamflow
Time Slot
Wednesday 23 September,morning session
WEBSITE
https://sites.google.com/alaska.edu/reginehock/

Regine Hock´s research focuses on assessing and modeling the effects of climate change on glaciers on scales ranging from individual glaciers to global with focus on impacts on global sea level and streamflow. Regine´s appointments include:

Coordinating Lead Author of the IPCC Special Report on the Oceans and the Cryosphere in a Warming Climate (2017-2019).
President of the International Association of Cryospheric Sciences (IACS) (2017-2021)
Chief Editor of Frontiers in Earth Science - Cryospheric Sciences, since Jan 2015
Vice president of the International Glaciological Society (IGS) (2012-2015)

Dr. Bernd Etzelmüller

Professor, Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Norway
Fields of expertise: Geomorphology, geomorphometry, cryosphere, permafrost, glaciology
Preliminary title
Permafrost in Europe in a changing climate
Time Slot
Tuesday 22 September, afternoon session
WEBSITE
https://www.mn.uio.no/geo/english/people/
aca/geohyd/bernde/

Bernd Etzelmüller´s research focuses on assessing and modeling the effects of climate change on geomorphological systems in cold arctic and high-mountain environments, during the last years with a focus on permafrost. In addition to Norway/Svalbard he has worked in the Yukon, Mongolia, Sweden and Iceland. He is running montioring systems for ground temperatures in Norway and Iceland, including in rock walls. These data are used to validate permafrost models, address the impact on climate change on these systems, and how the temperature regime is influencing landscape development in general.

Dr. Peter Bijl

Assistant Professor, Marine palynology & palaeoceanography, University of Utrecht, The Netherlands
Fields of expertise: Southern Ocean, Antarctica, paleoceanography, biostratigraphy, biomarkers, paleoclimate, ice-ocean interactions
Preliminary title
The oceanographic evolution of the Cenozoic Southwest Pacific Ocean: implications for past ice-ocean interactions
Time Slot
Wednesday 23 September, afternoon session
WEBSITE
https://www.uu.nl/staff/pkbijl/Profile

Peter Bijl's research interests can be summarized in the theme:  Climatic and environmental evolution of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. He uses sedimentary archives from drilling programs now known as the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP). He has worked on the reconstruction of the climatological evolution of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean in the Cenozoic transition from the hot early Eocene to the middle- and late Eocene cooling and the Oligocene-Neogene icehouse. He has also studied the consequences of the formation of the Antarctic Ice Sheet for ecosystems, sea level and ocean current systems. He currently leads the research project OceaNice, funded by the European Research Council, focussing on the role of ocean conditions on the melt of Antarctic ice sheets during past warm climates. In 2014, Peter recieved the EGU Arne Richter Award for outstanding young scientists and in 2018 the Heineken Young Scientist Award from the Royal Netherlands Society of Sciences.

Dr. Robert DeConto

Professor, Department of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA
Fields of expertise: Antarctic ice sheet history, Antarctic climate, sea level rise projections, ice sheet instabilities
Preliminary title
TBD
Time Slot
Wednesday 23 September, afternoon session
WEBSITE
https://www.geo.umass.edu/faculty/deconto/Site/Home.html

Robert DeConto studies past and future Antarctic climate, the history of the Antarctic ice sheet and its potential instability due to climatic warming. He pioneered a data-model integration strategy that was key to the success of the ANDRILL programme, central to the SCAR Antarctic Climate Evolution (ACE) and Past Antarctic Ice Sheet Evolution (PAIS) scientific research programmes, and eventually adapted by the International Ocean Drilling Program’s (IODP) science plan with an emphasis on the role of the South Polar region in climate evolution and sea level history.  Over the last decade, Rob has worked with colleagues to build on this basic methodology in a series of influential papers, incorporating new and significant ice loss processes that provide improved comparisons between model results and geological data, with recent models predicting a doubling in the amount of sea level rise by the end of the century and beyond.

Dr. Tandong Yao

Professor, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Fields of expertise: Third Pole environment,  glacier mass balance, ice core climate records, interaction between cryosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere.
Preliminary title
TBD
Time Slot
Wednesday 23 September, morning session
WEBSITE
http://tdyao.itpcas.ac.cn/index.html

Tandong Yao’s research addresses how the cryosphere in the Third Pole is changing and how its change is interacting with the hydrosphere and atmosphere and impacting the functioning of the Asian Water Towers. His focus is largely on the cryosphere changes recorded by glacier mass balance and ice core climate parameters in the Third Pole region. His research reveals the north-south contrast pattern of glacier fluctuations in the Third Pole under influence of the westerly and Indian monsoon interaction. He has been co-chairing the Third Pole Environment program since 2009. This international program is focusing not only on Third Pole environment change, but also on knowledge transfers to raise public awareness of climate changes and to enhance human adaptation to the changing environment. Prof. Tandong Yao is a member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.